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Repository Details

Project starter for Django 1.11.4 ... Batteries included :)

Django Version

Django Project Starter Template

My custom project starter for Django! I’ll try to support every upcoming Django releases as much as I can!

Requirements

  • Latest Python 3.6+ runtime environment.
  • pip, virtualenv, virtualenvwrapper
  • If you like to run Rake Tasks, you need Ruby too but not required.

Installation

Please use virtualenvwrapper and create your environment and activate it.

# example
$ mkvirtualenv my_projects_env
# or make it active:
$ workon my_projects_env

You need to declare 2 environment variables. I always put my project specific environment variables under virtualenvwrapper’s postactivate file. Open your ~/.virtualenvs/my_projects_env/bin/postactivate and add these lines:

export DJANGO_ENV="development"
export DJANGO_SECRET="YOUR-SECRET-HERE" # will fix it in a second.

then;

# for django 1.11.4
$ curl -L https://github.com/vigo/django-project-template/archive/django-1.11.4.zip > template.zip
$ unzip template.zip
$ mv django-project-template-django-1.11.4 my_project && rm template.zip
$ cd my_project/
$ cp config/settings/development.example.py config/settings/development.py
# development.py is not under revison control
$ pip install -r requirements/development.pip
$ git init # now you can start your own repo!

or, you can use installer script:

$ bash <(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/vigo/django-project-template/master/install.sh)
$ cd YOUR_PROJECT/
$ pip install -r requirements/development.pip
$ git init # now you can start your own repo!

This template comes with custom User model. Please take a look at it. If you need to add/change fields, please do so. If you change anything, please run makemigrations to keep track of your db. Then continue to work:

$ python manage.py migrate
$ python manage.py createsuperuser
# enter: Email, First Name, Last Name and password
$ python manage.py runserver_plus # or
$ rake

Now, please generate your secret via:

$ python manage.py generate_secret_key

and fix your ~/.virtualenvs/my_projects_env/bin/postactivate


Features

  • Custom User Model
  • Custom BaseModel
  • Custom BaseModelWithSoftDelete
  • Custom manager for BaseModel and BaseModelWithSoftDelete
  • More useful Django Application structure!
  • Settings abstraction: Development / Production / Heroku / Test
  • Requirement abstraction depending on your environment!
  • Custom logger and log formatters
  • App and Model creator management commands
  • Custom Locale middleware
  • Debug Mixins for your HTML templates
  • Handy utils: console, console.dir(), numerify, urlify, save_file
  • File widget for Django Admin: AdminImageFileWidget

Quick Start

Let’s create blog application. We’ll have two models. Post and Category. First, create application:

$ python manage.py baseapp_create_app blog
"blog" application created.


    - Do not forget to add your `blog` to `INSTALLED_APPS` under `config/settings/base.py`:

    INSTALLED_APPS += [
        'blog',
    ]

    - Do not forget to fix your `config/settings/urls.py`:

    urlpatterns = [
        # ...
        # this is just an example!
        url(r'^__blog__/', include('blog.urls', namespace='blog')),
        # ..
    ]

Fix your config/settings/base.py, add this newly created app to your INSTALLED_APPS:

# config/settings/base.py
:
:
AUTH_USER_MODEL = 'baseapp.User'

INSTALLED_APPS += [
    'blog',
]

Now, if you fix your config/settings/urls.py you’ll be able to see demo pages for your app:

# config/settings/urls.py
:
:
urlpatterns = [
    # ...
    url(r'^__blog__/', include('blog.urls', namespace='blog')),
    # ..
]

Now run server and call http://127.0.0.1:8000/__blog__/:

$ python manage.py runserver

You’ll see Hello from Blog page and If you check blog/views.py you’ll see and example usage of HtmlDebugMixin and console util.

from django.views.generic.base import TemplateView

from baseapp.mixins import HtmlDebugMixin
from baseapp.utils import console


console.configure(
    source='blog/views.py',
)


class BlogView(HtmlDebugMixin, TemplateView):
    template_name = 'blog/index.html'

    def get_context_data(self, **kwargs):
        self.hdbg('Hello from hdbg')
        kwargs = super().get_context_data(**kwargs)
        console.dir(self.request.user)
        return kwargs

Let’s look at our blog application structure:

applications/blog/
├── admin
│   └── __init__.py
├── migrations
│   └── __init__.py
├── models
│   └── __init__.py
├── apps.py
├── urls.py
└── views.py

Now lets add Post model with soft-delete feature!

$ python manage.py baseapp_create_model blog Post softdelete
models/post.py created.
admin/post.py created.
Post model added to models/__init__.py
Post model added to admin/__init__.py


    `Post` related files created successfully:

    - `blog/models/post.py`
    - `blog/admin/post.py`

    Please check your models before running `makemigrations` ok?

This creates blog/models/post.py and blog/admin/post.py files:

# blog/models/post.py

from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _
from django.db import models

from baseapp.models import BaseModelWithSoftDelete


__all__ = [
    'Post',
]


class Post(BaseModelWithSoftDelete):
    title = models.CharField(
        max_length=255,
        verbose_name=_('title'),
    )

    class Meta:
        app_label = 'blog'
        verbose_name = _('Post')
        verbose_name_plural = _('Post')
    
    def __str__(self):
        return self.title

and Category model:

$ python manage.py baseapp_create_model blog Category softdelete
models/category.py created.
admin/category.py created.
Category model added to models/__init__.py
Category model added to admin/__init__.py


    `Category` related files created successfully:

    - `blog/models/category.py`
    - `blog/admin/category.py`

    Please check your models before running `makemigrations` ok?

Now It’s time to fix our models by hand!

# blog/models/post.py

from django.conf import settings
from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _
from django.db import models

from baseapp.models import BaseModelWithSoftDelete


__all__ = [
    'Post',
]


class Post(BaseModelWithSoftDelete):
    author = models.ForeignKey(
        to=settings.AUTH_USER_MODEL,
        on_delete=models.CASCADE,
        related_name='posts',
        verbose_name=_('Author'),
    )
    category = models.ForeignKey(
        to='Category',
        on_delete=models.CASCADE,
        related_name='posts',
        verbose_name=_('Category'),
    )
    title = models.CharField(
        max_length=255,
        verbose_name=_('Title'),
    )
    body = models.TextField(
        verbose_name=_('Body'),
    )

    class Meta:
        app_label = 'blog'
        verbose_name = _('Post')
        verbose_name_plural = _('Post')

    def __str__(self):
        return self.title

We’ll keep blog/models/category.py same, Category will have only title field:

# blog/models/category.py

from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _
from django.db import models

from baseapp.models import BaseModelWithSoftDelete


__all__ = [
    'Category',
]


class Category(BaseModelWithSoftDelete):
    title = models.CharField(
        max_length=255,
        verbose_name=_('title'),
    )

    class Meta:
        app_label = 'blog'
        verbose_name = _('Category')
        verbose_name_plural = _('Category')
    
    def __str__(self):
        return self.title

Now It’s time to create migrations:

$ python manage.py makemigrations --name create_post_and_category
Migrations for 'blog':
  applications/blog/migrations/0001_create_post_and_category.py
    - Create model Category
    - Create model Post

Now migrate!

$ python manage.py migrate
Operations to perform:
  Apply all migrations: admin, auth, baseapp, blog, contenttypes, sessions
Running migrations:
  Applying blog.0001_create_post_and_category... OK

Now time to run server and dive in to admin page!

$ python manage.py runserver
Performing system checks...

System check identified no issues (0 silenced).
September 21, 2017 - 13:34:54
Django version 1.11.4, using settings 'config.settings.development'
Starting development server at http://127.0.0.1:8000/
Quit the server with CONTROL-C.

Open http://127.0.0.1:8000/admin/ and use your superuser credentials.


Project File/Folder Structure

What I’ve changed ?

  • All Django apps live under applications/ folder.
  • All of the models live under models/ folder.
  • All of the admin files live under admin/ folder.
  • Every app should contain It’s own urls.py.
  • All settings related files will live under config/settings/ folder.
  • Every environment has It’s own setting such as config/settings/development.py.
  • Every environment/settings can have It’s own package/module requirements.
  • All of the templates live under basedir’s templates/APP_NAME folder.
  • All of the locales live under basedir’s locale/LANG/... folder.
  • Lastly, Ruby and Python can be friends in a Django Project!

Here is directory/file structure:

.
├── applications
│   └── baseapp
│       ├── admin
│       ├── libs
│       ├── management
│       ├── middlewares
│       ├── migrations
│       ├── mixins
│       ├── models
│       ├── static
│       ├── templatetags
│       ├── tests
│       ├── utils
│       ├── widgets
│       ├── __init__.py
│       ├── apps.py
│       ├── urls.py
│       └── views.py
├── config
│   ├── settings
│   │   ├── __init__.py
│   │   ├── base.py
│   │   ├── development.example.py
│   │   ├── development.py
│   │   ├── heroku.py
│   │   └── test.py
│   ├── __init__.py
│   ├── urls.py
│   └── wsgi.py
├── db
│   └── development.sqlite3
├── locale
│   └── tr
│       └── LC_MESSAGES
├── media
│   └── avatar
├── requirements
│   ├── base.pip
│   ├── development.pip
│   └── heroku.pip
├── static
├── templates
│   └── baseapp
│       ├── base.html
│       └── index.html
├── LICENSE.txt
├── Procfile
├── README.md
├── Rakefile
├── manage.py
├── requirements.txt
└── runtime.txt

Settings and Requirements Abstraction

By default, manage.py looks for DJANGO_ENV environment variable. Builds DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE environment variable according to DJANGO_ENV variable. If your DJANGO_ENV environment variable is set to production, this means that you are running config/settings/production.py.

Also config/wsgi.py looks for DJANGO_ENV environment variable too. For example, If you want to deploy this application to HEROKU, you need config/settings/heroku.py and must add config variable DJANGO_ENV and set it to heroku on HEROKU site. (You’ll find more information further below)

All the other settings files (according to environment) imports config/settings/base.py and gets everything from it. development.py is un-tracked/git-ignored file. Original file is development.example.py. You need to create a copy of it! (if you follow along from the beginning, you’ve already did this)

All the base/common required Python packages/modules are defined under requirements/base.pip:

Django==1.11.4
Pillow==4.2.1

development.py

Logging is enabled. In CUSTOM_LOGGER_OPTIONS, you can specify un-wanted file types not to log your dev-console. You can un-comment django.db.backends if you want to see the SQL queries. Example:

LOGGING = {
    :
    :
    'loggers': {
        :
        :
        'django.db.backends': {
            'handlers': ['console_sql'],
            'level': 'DEBUG',
        },
        
    }
}

By default, this template ships with 2 awesome/handy Django packages:

We are using Werkzeug as Django server and overriding It’s logging formats. Django Extension adds great functionalities:

  • admin_generator
  • clean_pyc
  • clear_cache
  • compile_pyc
  • create_app
  • create_command
  • create_jobs
  • create_template_tags
  • delete_squashed_migrations
  • describe_form
  • drop_test_database
  • dumpscript
  • export_emails
  • find_template
  • generate_secret_key
  • graph_models
  • mail_debug
  • notes
  • passwd
  • pipchecker
  • print_settings
  • print_user_for_session
  • reset_db
  • runjob
  • runjobs
  • runprofileserver
  • runscript
  • runserver_plus
  • set_default_site
  • set_fake_emails
  • set_fake_passwords
  • shell_plus
  • show_template_tags
  • show_templatetags
  • show_urls
  • sqlcreate
  • sqldiff
  • sqldsn
  • sync_s3
  • syncdata
  • unreferenced_files
  • update_permissions
  • validate_templates

One of my favorite: python manage.py show_urls :)

AUTH_PASSWORD_VALIDATORS are removed for development purposes. You can enter simple passwords such as 1234. MEDIA_ROOT is set to basedir’s media folder, STATICFILES_DIRS includes basedir’s static folder.

All the required modules are defined under requirements/development.pip:

# requirements/development.pip
-r base.pip
ipython==6.1.0
django-extensions==1.9.0
Werkzeug==0.12.2
django-debug-toolbar==1.8

test.py

Basic settings for running tests.

heroku.py

You can deploy your app to HEROKU super easy. Just set your ALLOWED_HOSTS. Add your heroku domain here:

ALLOWED_HOSTS = [
    'lit-eyrie-63238.herokuapp.com', # example heroku domain
]

All the required modules are defined under requirements/heroku.pip:

# requirements/heroku.pip
-r base.pip
gunicorn==19.7.1
psycopg2==2.7.3
dj-database-url==0.4.2
whitenoise==3.3.0

By default, Heroku requires requirements.txt. Therefore we have it too :)

# requirements.txt
-r requirements/heroku.pip

Heroku also requires Procfile and runtime.txt. Both provided in the basedir. Don’t forget to create heroku config variables:

$ heroku login
$ heroku apps:create
$ heroku addons:create heroku-postgresql:hobby-dev
$ heroku config:set DJANGO_ENV="heroku"
$ heroku config:set DJANGO_SECRET='YOUR_GENERATED_RANDOM_SECRET'
$ heroku config:set WEB_CONCURRENCY=3
$ git push heroku master
$ heroku run python manage.py migrate
$ heroku run python manage.py createsuperuser

Others

If you are using different platform or OS, such as Ubuntu or your custom servers, you can follow the settings and requirements conventions. If you name it production, create your config/settings/production.py and requirements/production.pip. You must set you DJANGO_ENV to production and don’t forget to set DJANGO_ENV and DJANGO_SECRET on your production server!


User model

This is custom model which uses AbstractBaseUser and PermissionsMixin. Fields are:

  • created_at
  • updated_at
  • email
  • first_name
  • middle_name (optional)
  • last_name
  • avatar (optional)
  • is_active
  • is_staff
  • is_superuser

Username field is set to: email. Your users will login using their email’s and password’s by default. You can modify everything if you like to. This also mimics like default User model of Django. Available methods are:

  • get_short_name
  • get_full_name

BaseModel

This is a common model. By default, BaseModel contains these fields:

  • created_at
  • updated_at
  • status

Also has custom manager called: objects_bm. There are 4 basic status types:

STATUS_OFFLINE = 0
STATUS_ONLINE = 1
STATUS_DELETED = 2
STATUS_DRAFT = 3

Custom manager has custom querysets against these statuses such as:

>>> Post.objects_bm.deleted()  # filters: status = STATUS_DELETED
>>> Post.objects_bm.actives()  # filters: status = STATUS_ONLINE
>>> Post.objects_bm.offlines() # filters: status = STATUS_OFFLINE
>>> Post.objects_bm.drafts()   # filters: status = STATUS_DRAFT

BaseModelWithSoftDelete

This model inherits from BaseModel and provides fake deletion which is probably called SOFT DELETE. Works with related objects who has on_delete option is set to models.CASCADE. This means, when you call model’s delete() method or QuerySet’s delete() method, it acts like delete action but never deletes the data.

Just sets the status field to STATUS_DELETED and sets deleted_at field to NOW.

This works exactly like Django’s delete(). Broadcasts pre_delete and post_delete signals and returns the number of objects marked as deleted and a dictionary with the number of deletion-marks per object type.

>>> Post.objects_bm.all()

SELECT "blog_post"."id",
       "blog_post"."created_at",
       "blog_post"."updated_at",
       "blog_post"."status",
       "blog_post"."deleted_at",
       "blog_post"."author_id",
       "blog_post"."category_id",
       "blog_post"."title",
       "blog_post"."body"
  FROM "blog_post"
 LIMIT 21

Execution time: 0.000135s [Database: default]

<BaseModelWithSoftDeleteQuerySet [<Post: Python post 1>, <Post: Python post 2>, <Post: Python post 3>]>

>>> Category.objects_bm.all()

SELECT "blog_category"."id",
       "blog_category"."created_at",
       "blog_category"."updated_at",
       "blog_category"."status",
       "blog_category"."deleted_at",
       "blog_category"."title"
  FROM "blog_category"
 WHERE "blog_category"."deleted_at" IS NULL
 LIMIT 21

<BaseModelWithSoftDeleteQuerySet [<Category: Python>]>

>>> Category.objects_bm.delete()
(4, {'blog.Category': 1, 'blog.Post': 3})

>>> Category.objects_bm.all()
<BaseModelWithSoftDeleteQuerySet []>       # rows are still there! don’t panic!

>>> Category.objects.all()
<QuerySet [<Category: Python>]>

BaseModelWithSoftDeleteQuerySet has these query options according to status field:

  • .all()
  • .delete()
  • .undelete()
  • .deleted()

When soft-delete enabled (during model creation), Django admin will automatically use BaseAdminWithSoftDelete which is inherited from: BaseAdmin <- admin.ModelAdmin.


BaseAdmin, BaseAdminWithSoftDelete

Inherits from admin.ModelAdmin. By default, adds status to list_filter. You can disable this via setting sticky_list_filter = None. When model is created with rake new:model... or from management command, admin file is automatically generated.

Example for Post model admin.

from django.contrib import admin

from baseapp.admin import BaseAdminWithSoftDelete

from ..models import Post


__all__ = [
    'PostAdmin',
]


class PostAdmin(BaseAdminWithSoftDelete):
    # sticky_list_filter = None
    # hide_deleted_at = False
    pass


admin.site.register(Post, PostAdmin)

By default, deleted_at excluded from admin form like created_at and updated_at fields. You can also override this via hide_deleted_at attribute. Comment/Uncomment lines according to your needs! This works only in BaseAdminWithSoftDelete.

BaseAdminWithSoftDelete also comes with special admin action. You can recover/make active (undelete) multiple objects like deleting items.


Custom logger and log formatters

Template ships with CustomWerkzeugLogFormatter and CustomSqlLogFormatter. Default development server uses Werkzeug. Logging is customized against Werkzeug’s output. Example usage:

import logging
logger = logging.getLogger('user_logger') # config/setting/development.py
logger.warning('This is Warning')

werkzueg_filter_extenstions_callback is stands for CUSTOM_LOGGER_OPTIONS’s hide_these_extensions settings.


CustomLocaleMiddleware

This is mostly used for our custom projects. Injects LANGUAGE_CODE variable to request object. /en/path/to/page/ sets request.LANGUAGE_CODE to en otherwise tr.

# add this to your settings/base.py
MIDDLEWARE += [
    'baseapp.middlewares.CustomLocaleMiddleware',
]

HtmlDebugMixin

HtmlDebugMixin injects {{ IS_DEBUG }} and {{ LANG }} template variables to context. Also with self.hdbg(arg, arg, arg) method, you can debug anything from view to html template...

# example: views.py

from django.views.generic.base import TemplateView

from baseapp.mixins import HtmlDebugMixin

class IndexView(HtmlDebugMixin, TemplateView):
    template_name = 'index.html'

    def get_context_data(self, **kwargs):
        self.hdbg('This', 'is', 'an', 'example', 'of')
        self.hdbg('self.hdbg', 'usage')
        self.hdbg(self.request.__dict__)
        return kwargs

Just add {% hdbg %} in to your templates/index.html:

<!-- example: index.html -->
<h1>Hello World</h1>
{% hdbg %}

Outputs to Html:

('This', 'is', 'an', 'example', 'of')
('self.hdbg', 'usage')
({'COOKIES': {'__utma': '****',
              '__utmz': '****',
              'csrftoken': '****',
              'djdt': 'hide',
              'language': 'tr'},
  'META': {'CSRF_COOKIE': '****',
           'CSRF_COOKIE_USED': True,
           'HTTP_ACCEPT': 'text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8',
           'HTTP_ACCEPT_ENCODING': 'gzip, deflate',
           'HTTP_ACCEPT_LANGUAGE': 'en-us',
           'HTTP_CONNECTION': 'keep-alive',
           'HTTP_COOKIE': '****; ',
           'HTTP_DNT': '1',
           'HTTP_HOST': '127.0.0.1:8000',
           'HTTP_UPGRADE_INSECURE_REQUESTS': '1',
           'HTTP_USER_AGENT': 'Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_12_6) '
                              'AppleWebKit/603.3.8 (KHTML, like Gecko) '
                              'Version/10.1.2 Safari/603.3.8',
           'PATH_INFO': '/__baseapp__/',
           'QUERY_STRING': '',
           'REMOTE_ADDR': '127.0.0.1',
           'REMOTE_PORT': 61081,
           'REQUEST_METHOD': 'GET',
           'SCRIPT_NAME': '',
           'SERVER_NAME': '127.0.0.1',
           'SERVER_PORT': '8000',
           'SERVER_PROTOCOL': 'HTTP/1.1',
           'SERVER_SOFTWARE': 'Werkzeug/0.12.2',
           'werkzeug.request': <BaseRequest 'http://127.0.0.1:8000/__baseapp__/' [GET]>,
           'wsgi.errors': <_io.TextIOWrapper name='<stderr>' mode='w' encoding='UTF-8'>,
           'wsgi.input': <_io.BufferedReader name=6>,
           'wsgi.multiprocess': False,
           'wsgi.multithread': False,
           'wsgi.run_once': False,
           'wsgi.url_scheme': 'http',
           'wsgi.version': (1, 0)},
  '_cached_user': <django.contrib.auth.models.AnonymousUser object at 0x111360e48>,
  '_messages': <django.contrib.messages.storage.fallback.FallbackStorage object at 0x111360748>,
  '_post_parse_error': False,
  '_read_started': False,
  '_stream': <django.core.handlers.wsgi.LimitedStream object at 0x1113602e8>,
  'content_params': {},
  'content_type': '',
  'csrf_processing_done': True,
  'environ': {'CSRF_COOKIE': '****',
              'CSRF_COOKIE_USED': True,
              'HTTP_ACCEPT': 'text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8',
              'HTTP_ACCEPT_ENCODING': 'gzip, deflate',
              'HTTP_ACCEPT_LANGUAGE': 'en-us',
              'HTTP_CONNECTION': 'keep-alive',
              'HTTP_COOKIE': '****',
              'HTTP_DNT': '1',
              'HTTP_HOST': '127.0.0.1:8000',
              'HTTP_UPGRADE_INSECURE_REQUESTS': '1',
              'HTTP_USER_AGENT': 'Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X '
                                 '10_12_6) AppleWebKit/603.3.8 (KHTML, like '
                                 'Gecko) Version/10.1.2 Safari/603.3.8',
              'PATH_INFO': '/__baseapp__/',
              'QUERY_STRING': '',
              'REMOTE_ADDR': '127.0.0.1',
              'REMOTE_PORT': 61081,
              'REQUEST_METHOD': 'GET',
              'SCRIPT_NAME': '',
              'SERVER_NAME': '127.0.0.1',
              'SERVER_PORT': '8000',
              'SERVER_PROTOCOL': 'HTTP/1.1',
              'SERVER_SOFTWARE': 'Werkzeug/0.12.2',
              'werkzeug.request': <BaseRequest 'http://127.0.0.1:8000/__baseapp__/' [GET]>,
              'wsgi.errors': <_io.TextIOWrapper name='<stderr>' mode='w' encoding='UTF-8'>,
              'wsgi.input': <_io.BufferedReader name=6>,
              'wsgi.multiprocess': False,
              'wsgi.multithread': False,
              'wsgi.run_once': False,
              'wsgi.url_scheme': 'http',
              'wsgi.version': (1, 0)},
  'method': 'GET',
  'path': '/__baseapp__/',
  'path_info': '/__baseapp__/',
  'resolver_match': ResolverMatch(func=baseapp.views.IndexView, args=(), kwargs={}, url_name=index, app_names=[], namespaces=['baseapp']),
  'session': <django.contrib.sessions.backends.db.SessionStore object at 0x111360240>,
  'user': <SimpleLazyObject: <django.contrib.auth.models.AnonymousUser object at 0x111360e48>>},)

baseapp.utils.console

Do you need to debug an object from the View or anywhere from your Python script? Sometimes you need to print out some variable(s) or values to console and you want to keep it safe right? print() is very dangerous if you forget on production server.

console(), console.dir() they both work only under DEBUG = True mode.

# example: views.py

from baseapp.utils import console

class IndexView(TemplateView):
    def get_context_data(self, **kwargs):
        kwargs = super().get_context_data(**kwargs)
        console('Hello', 'World')
        console.dir(self.request.user)
        return kwargs

Now console.dir() outputs to terminal:

instance of AnonymousUser | <class 'django.utils.functional.SimpleLazyObject'>**
(   {   'arg': (   <SimpleLazyObject: <django.contrib.auth.models.AnonymousUser object at 0x10c3229e8>>,),
        'instance_attributes': ['_setupfunc', '_wrapped'],
        'internal_methods': [   '__class__', '__delattr__', '__dict__',
                                '__dir__', '__doc__', '__eq__', '__format__',
                                '__ge__', '__getattribute__', '__gt__',
                                '__hash__', '__init__', '__init_subclass__',
                                '__le__', '__lt__', '__module__', '__ne__',
                                '__new__', '__reduce__', '__reduce_ex__',
                                '__repr__', '__setattr__', '__sizeof__',
                                '__str__', '__subclasshook__', '__weakref__'],
        'private_methods': ['_groups', '_user_permissions'],
        'public_attributes': [   'check_password', 'delete',
                                 'get_all_permissions',
                                 'get_group_permissions', 'get_username',
                                 'groups', 'has_module_perms', 'has_perm',
                                 'has_perms', 'id', 'is_active',
                                 'is_anonymous', 'is_authenticated',
                                 'is_staff', 'is_superuser', 'pk', 'save',
                                 'set_password', 'user_permissions',
                                 'username'],
        'public_methods': ['_setupfunc']},)
********************************************************************************

You can set defaults for console:

from baseapp.utils import console

console.configure(
    char='x',            # banners will use `x` character
    source='console.py', # banner title will be `console.py`
    width=8,             # output width will wrap to 8 chars (demo purpose)
    indent=8,            # 8 characters will be userd for indention (demo purpose)
    color='white',       # banner color will be: white
)

console.configure(color='default') # resets color
console('Hello again...')

There are few basic color options available:

  • black
  • red
  • green
  • yellow
  • blue
  • magenta
  • cyan
  • white
  • default

baseapp.utils.numerify

Little helper for catching QUERY_STRING parameters for numerical values:

from baseapp.utils import numerify

>>> numerify("1")
1
>>> numerify("1a")
-1
>>> numerify("ab")
-1
>>> numerify("abc", default=44)
44

baseapp.utils.urlify

Turkish language and Django’s slugify are not working well together. This little pre-processor will prep string for slugification :)

from django.utils.text import slugify
from baseapp.utils import urlify

>>> slugify(urlify('Merhaba Dünya!'))
'merhaba-dunya'

>>>  slugify(urlify('Merhaba Dünya! ĞŞİ'))
'merhaba-dunya-gsi'

baseapp.utils.save_file

While using FileField, sometimes you need to handle uploaded files. In this case, you need to use upload_to attribute. Take a look at the example in baseapp/models/user.py:

from baseapp.utils import save_file as custom_save_file
:
:
:
class User(AbstractBaseUser, PermissionsMixin):
    :
    :
    avatar = models.FileField(
        upload_to=save_user_avatar,
        verbose_name=_('Profile Image'),
        null=True,
        blank=True,
    )
    :
    :

save_user_avatar returns custom_save_file’s return value. Default configuration of for custom_save_file is save_file(instance, filename, upload_to='upload/%Y/%m/%d/'). Uploads are go to such as MEDIA_ROOT/upload/2017/09/21/...

Make your custom uploads like:

from baseapp.utils import save_file as custom_save_file

def my_custom_uploader(instance, filename):
    # do your stuff
    # at the end, call:
    return custom_save_file(instance, filename, upload_to='images/%Y/')


class MyModel(models.Model):
    image = models.FileField(
        upload_to='my_custom_uploader',
        verbose_name=_('Profile Image'),
    )

AdminImageFileWidget

Use this widget in your admin forms:

from baseapp.widgets import AdminImageFileWidget

class MyAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    formfield_overrides = {
        models.FileField: {'widget': AdminImageFileWidget},
    }

This widget uses Pillow (Python Image Library) which ships with your base.pip requirements file. Show image preview, width x height if the file is image.


Rakefile

If you have Ruby installed, you’ll have lots of handy tasks for the project. Type rake -T for list of tasks:

$ rake -T
rake db:migrate[database]                                        # Run migration for given database (default: 'default')
rake db:roll_back[name_of_application,name_of_migration]         # Roll-back (name of application, name of migration)
rake db:shell                                                    # run database shell ..
rake db:show[name_of_application]                                # Show migrations for an application (default: 'all')
rake db:update[name_of_application,name_of_migration,is_empty]   # Update migration (name of application, name of migration?, is empty?)
rake locale:compile                                              # Compile locale dictionary
rake locale:update                                               # Update locale dictionary
rake new:application[name_of_application]                        # Create new Django application
rake new:model[name_of_application,name_of_model,type_of_model]  # Create new Model for given application
rake run_server                                                  # Run server
rake shell                                                       # Run shell+
rake test:baseapp                                                # Run test against baseapp

Default task is run_server. Just type rake that’s it! runserver uses runserver_plus. This means you have lots of debugging options!

rake db:migrate[database]

Migrates database with given database name. Default is default. If you like to work multiple databases:

# config/settings/development.py

DATABASES = {
    'default': {
        'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.sqlite3',
        'NAME': os.path.join(BASE_DIR, 'db', 'development.sqlite3'),
    },
    'my_database': {
        'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.sqlite3',
        'NAME': os.path.join(BASE_DIR, 'db', 'my_database.sqlite3'),
    }
}

You can just call rake db:migrate or specify different database like: rake db:migrate[my_database] :)

rake db:roll_back[name_of_application,name_of_migration]

Your database must be rollable :) To see available migrations: rake db:roll_back[NAME_OF_YOUR_APPLICATION]. Look at the list and choose your target migration (example): rake db:roll_back[baseapp,0001_create_custom_user].

# example scenario
$ rake db:roll_back[baseapp]
Please select your migration:
baseapp
 [X] 0001_create_custom_user
 [X] 0002_post_model

$ rake db:roll_back[baseapp,0001_create_custom_user]

rake db:shell

Runs default database client.

rake db:show[name_of_application]

Show migrations. Examples:

$ rake db:show # shows everything
admin
 [X] 0001_initial
 [X] 0002_logentry_remove_auto_add
auth
 [X] 0001_initial
 [X] 0002_alter_permission_name_max_length
 [X] 0003_alter_user_email_max_length
 [X] 0004_alter_user_username_opts
 [X] 0005_alter_user_last_login_null
 [X] 0006_require_contenttypes_0002
 [X] 0007_alter_validators_add_error_messages
 [X] 0008_alter_user_username_max_length
baseapp
 [X] 0001_create_custom_user
blog
 [X] 0001_create_post_and_category
contenttypes
 [X] 0001_initial
 [X] 0002_remove_content_type_name
sessions
 [X] 0001_initial

or just a specific app:

$ rake db:show[blog]
blog
 [X] 0001_create_post_and_category

rake db:update[name_of_application,name_of_migration,is_empty]

When you add/change something in the model, you need to create migrations. Use this task. Let’s say you have added new field to Post model in your blog app:

$ rake db:update[blog]                           # automatic migration (example)
Migrations for 'blog':
  applications/blog/migrations/0003_auto_20170921_1357.py
    - Alter field category on post
    - Alter field title on post

$ rake db:update[blog,add_new_field_to_post]     # migration with name (example)
Migrations for 'blog':
  applications/blog/migrations/0002_add_new_field_to_post.py

$ rake db:update[blog,add_new_field_to_post,yes] # migration with name (example)
Migrations for 'blog':
  applications/blog/migrations/0002_empty_mig.py

rake locale:compile and rake locale:update

When you make changes in your application related to locales, run: rake locale:update. When you finish editing your django.po file, run rake locale:compile.

rake new:application[name_of_application]

Creates new application!

$ rake new:application[blog]

rake new:model[name_of_application,name_of_model,type_of_model]

Creates new model! Available model types are: django (default), basemodel and softdelete.

$ rake new:model[blog,Post]                # will create model using Django’s `models.Model`
$ rake new:model[blog,Post,basemodel]      # will create model using our `BaseModel`
$ rake new:model[blog,Post,softdelete]     # will create model using our `BaseModelWithSoftDelete`

rake shell

Runs Django repl/shell with use shell_plus of django-extensions. rake shell. This loads everything to your shell! Also you can see the SQL statements while playing in shell.

rake test:baseapp

Runs tests of baseapp!


Tests

$ DJANGO_ENV=test python manage.py test baseapp -v 2 # or
$ DJANGO_ENV=test python manage.py test baseapp.tests.CustomUserTestCase # single, or
$ rake test:baseapp

Notes

If you created models via management command or rake task, you’ll have admin file automatically and generated against your model type. If you created a model with BaseModelWithSoftDelete, you’ll have BaseAdminWithSoftDelete set.

BaseAdminWithSoftDelete uses objects_bm in get_queryset and by default, you’ll have extra actions and soft delete feature. If you don’t want to use objects_bm manager, you need to override it manually:

# example: blog/admin/post.py

from django.contrib import admin

from baseapp.admin import BaseAdminWithSoftDelete

from ..models import Post


__all__ = [
    'PostAdmin',
]


class PostAdmin(BaseAdminWithSoftDelete):
    # sticky_list_filter = None
    # hide_deleted_at = False
    
    def get_queryset(self, request):
        return self.model.objects.get_queryset()  # this line!


admin.site.register(Post, PostAdmin)

Manual Usage

Let’s assume you need a model called: Page. Create a file under YOUR_APP/models/page.py:

# YOUR_APP/models/page.py

from django.db import models


__all__ = [
    'Page',
]

class Page(models.Model):
    # define your fields here...
    pass

# YOUR_APP/models/__init__.py
# append:
from .page import *

Now make migrations etc... Use it as from YOUR_APP.models import Page :)


Contributer(s)


Contribute

All PR’s are welcome!

  1. fork (https://github.com/vigo/django-project-template/fork)
  2. Create your branch (git checkout -b my-features)
  3. commit yours (git commit -am 'added killer options')
  4. push your branch (git push origin my-features)
  5. Than create a new Pull Request!

License

This project is licensed under MIT


Change Log

2018-01-25

  • Fix: model generator now creates more meaningfull file names such as CustomDataPage => custom_data_page.py in models/ and admins/
  • Fix: admin generator now imports (example:) CustomDataPageAdmin instead of CustomDataPage.

2017-10-02

  • Added: created_at and updated_at fields to custom User model.

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