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A Java API for generating .java source files.

JavaPoet

JavaPoet is a Java API for generating .java source files.

Source file generation can be useful when doing things such as annotation processing or interacting with metadata files (e.g., database schemas, protocol formats). By generating code, you eliminate the need to write boilerplate while also keeping a single source of truth for the metadata.

Example

Here's a (boring) HelloWorld class:

package com.example.helloworld;

public final class HelloWorld {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println("Hello, JavaPoet!");
  }
}

And this is the (exciting) code to generate it with JavaPoet:

MethodSpec main = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("main")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC, Modifier.STATIC)
    .returns(void.class)
    .addParameter(String[].class, "args")
    .addStatement("$T.out.println($S)", System.class, "Hello, JavaPoet!")
    .build();

TypeSpec helloWorld = TypeSpec.classBuilder("HelloWorld")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC, Modifier.FINAL)
    .addMethod(main)
    .build();

JavaFile javaFile = JavaFile.builder("com.example.helloworld", helloWorld)
    .build();

javaFile.writeTo(System.out);

To declare the main method, we've created a MethodSpec "main" configured with modifiers, return type, parameters and code statements. We add the main method to a HelloWorld class, and then add that to a HelloWorld.java file.

In this case we write the file to System.out, but we could also get it as a string (JavaFile.toString()) or write it to the file system (JavaFile.writeTo()).

The Javadoc catalogs the complete JavaPoet API, which we explore below.

Code & Control Flow

Most of JavaPoet's API uses plain old immutable Java objects. There's also builders, method chaining and varargs to make the API friendly. JavaPoet offers models for classes & interfaces (TypeSpec), fields (FieldSpec), methods & constructors (MethodSpec), parameters (ParameterSpec) and annotations (AnnotationSpec).

But the body of methods and constructors is not modeled. There's no expression class, no statement class or syntax tree nodes. Instead, JavaPoet uses strings for code blocks:

MethodSpec main = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("main")
    .addCode(""
        + "int total = 0;\n"
        + "for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {\n"
        + "  total += i;\n"
        + "}\n")
    .build();

Which generates this:

void main() {
  int total = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    total += i;
  }
}

The manual semicolons, line wrapping, and indentation are tedious and so JavaPoet offers APIs to make it easier. There's addStatement() which takes care of semicolons and newline, and beginControlFlow() + endControlFlow() which are used together for braces, newlines, and indentation:

MethodSpec main = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("main")
    .addStatement("int total = 0")
    .beginControlFlow("for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)")
    .addStatement("total += i")
    .endControlFlow()
    .build();

This example is lame because the generated code is constant! Suppose instead of just adding 0 to 10, we want to make the operation and range configurable. Here's a method that generates a method:

private MethodSpec computeRange(String name, int from, int to, String op) {
  return MethodSpec.methodBuilder(name)
      .returns(int.class)
      .addStatement("int result = 1")
      .beginControlFlow("for (int i = " + from + "; i < " + to + "; i++)")
      .addStatement("result = result " + op + " i")
      .endControlFlow()
      .addStatement("return result")
      .build();
}

And here's what we get when we call computeRange("multiply10to20", 10, 20, "*"):

int multiply10to20() {
  int result = 1;
  for (int i = 10; i < 20; i++) {
    result = result * i;
  }
  return result;
}

Methods generating methods! And since JavaPoet generates source instead of bytecode, you can read through it to make sure it's right.

Some control flow statements, such as if/else, can have unlimited control flow possibilities. You can handle those options using nextControlFlow():

MethodSpec main = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("main")
    .addStatement("long now = $T.currentTimeMillis()", System.class)
    .beginControlFlow("if ($T.currentTimeMillis() < now)", System.class)
    .addStatement("$T.out.println($S)", System.class, "Time travelling, woo hoo!")
    .nextControlFlow("else if ($T.currentTimeMillis() == now)", System.class)
    .addStatement("$T.out.println($S)", System.class, "Time stood still!")
    .nextControlFlow("else")
    .addStatement("$T.out.println($S)", System.class, "Ok, time still moving forward")
    .endControlFlow()
    .build();

Which generates:

void main() {
  long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
  if (System.currentTimeMillis() < now)  {
    System.out.println("Time travelling, woo hoo!");
  } else if (System.currentTimeMillis() == now) {
    System.out.println("Time stood still!");
  } else {
    System.out.println("Ok, time still moving forward");
  }
}

Catching exceptions using try/catch is also a use case for nextControlFlow():

MethodSpec main = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("main")
    .beginControlFlow("try")
    .addStatement("throw new Exception($S)", "Failed")
    .nextControlFlow("catch ($T e)", Exception.class)
    .addStatement("throw new $T(e)", RuntimeException.class)
    .endControlFlow()
    .build();

Which produces:

void main() {
  try {
    throw new Exception("Failed");
  } catch (Exception e) {
    throw new RuntimeException(e);
  }
}

$L for Literals

The string-concatenation in calls to beginControlFlow() and addStatement is distracting. Too many operators. To address this, JavaPoet offers a syntax inspired-by but incompatible-with String.format(). It accepts $L to emit a literal value in the output. This works just like Formatter's %s:

private MethodSpec computeRange(String name, int from, int to, String op) {
  return MethodSpec.methodBuilder(name)
      .returns(int.class)
      .addStatement("int result = 0")
      .beginControlFlow("for (int i = $L; i < $L; i++)", from, to)
      .addStatement("result = result $L i", op)
      .endControlFlow()
      .addStatement("return result")
      .build();
}

Literals are emitted directly to the output code with no escaping. Arguments for literals may be strings, primitives, and a few JavaPoet types described below.

$S for Strings

When emitting code that includes string literals, we can use $S to emit a string, complete with wrapping quotation marks and escaping. Here's a program that emits 3 methods, each of which returns its own name:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
  TypeSpec helloWorld = TypeSpec.classBuilder("HelloWorld")
      .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC, Modifier.FINAL)
      .addMethod(whatsMyName("slimShady"))
      .addMethod(whatsMyName("eminem"))
      .addMethod(whatsMyName("marshallMathers"))
      .build();

  JavaFile javaFile = JavaFile.builder("com.example.helloworld", helloWorld)
      .build();

  javaFile.writeTo(System.out);
}

private static MethodSpec whatsMyName(String name) {
  return MethodSpec.methodBuilder(name)
      .returns(String.class)
      .addStatement("return $S", name)
      .build();
}

In this case, using $S gives us quotation marks:

public final class HelloWorld {
  String slimShady() {
    return "slimShady";
  }

  String eminem() {
    return "eminem";
  }

  String marshallMathers() {
    return "marshallMathers";
  }
}

$T for Types

We Java programmers love our types: they make our code easier to understand. And JavaPoet is on board. It has rich built-in support for types, including automatic generation of import statements. Just use $T to reference types:

MethodSpec today = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("today")
    .returns(Date.class)
    .addStatement("return new $T()", Date.class)
    .build();

TypeSpec helloWorld = TypeSpec.classBuilder("HelloWorld")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC, Modifier.FINAL)
    .addMethod(today)
    .build();

JavaFile javaFile = JavaFile.builder("com.example.helloworld", helloWorld)
    .build();

javaFile.writeTo(System.out);

That generates the following .java file, complete with the necessary import:

package com.example.helloworld;

import java.util.Date;

public final class HelloWorld {
  Date today() {
    return new Date();
  }
}

We passed Date.class to reference a class that just-so-happens to be available when we're generating code. This doesn't need to be the case. Here's a similar example, but this one references a class that doesn't exist (yet):

ClassName hoverboard = ClassName.get("com.mattel", "Hoverboard");

MethodSpec today = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("tomorrow")
    .returns(hoverboard)
    .addStatement("return new $T()", hoverboard)
    .build();

And that not-yet-existent class is imported as well:

package com.example.helloworld;

import com.mattel.Hoverboard;

public final class HelloWorld {
  Hoverboard tomorrow() {
    return new Hoverboard();
  }
}

The ClassName type is very important, and you'll need it frequently when you're using JavaPoet. It can identify any declared class. Declared types are just the beginning of Java's rich type system: we also have arrays, parameterized types, wildcard types, and type variables. JavaPoet has classes for building each of these:

ClassName hoverboard = ClassName.get("com.mattel", "Hoverboard");
ClassName list = ClassName.get("java.util", "List");
ClassName arrayList = ClassName.get("java.util", "ArrayList");
TypeName listOfHoverboards = ParameterizedTypeName.get(list, hoverboard);

MethodSpec beyond = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("beyond")
    .returns(listOfHoverboards)
    .addStatement("$T result = new $T<>()", listOfHoverboards, arrayList)
    .addStatement("result.add(new $T())", hoverboard)
    .addStatement("result.add(new $T())", hoverboard)
    .addStatement("result.add(new $T())", hoverboard)
    .addStatement("return result")
    .build();

JavaPoet will decompose each type and import its components where possible.

package com.example.helloworld;

import com.mattel.Hoverboard;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public final class HelloWorld {
  List<Hoverboard> beyond() {
    List<Hoverboard> result = new ArrayList<>();
    result.add(new Hoverboard());
    result.add(new Hoverboard());
    result.add(new Hoverboard());
    return result;
  }
}

Import static

JavaPoet supports import static. It does it via explicitly collecting type member names. Let's enhance the previous example with some static sugar:

...
ClassName namedBoards = ClassName.get("com.mattel", "Hoverboard", "Boards");

MethodSpec beyond = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("beyond")
    .returns(listOfHoverboards)
    .addStatement("$T result = new $T<>()", listOfHoverboards, arrayList)
    .addStatement("result.add($T.createNimbus(2000))", hoverboard)
    .addStatement("result.add($T.createNimbus(\"2001\"))", hoverboard)
    .addStatement("result.add($T.createNimbus($T.THUNDERBOLT))", hoverboard, namedBoards)
    .addStatement("$T.sort(result)", Collections.class)
    .addStatement("return result.isEmpty() ? $T.emptyList() : result", Collections.class)
    .build();

TypeSpec hello = TypeSpec.classBuilder("HelloWorld")
    .addMethod(beyond)
    .build();

JavaFile.builder("com.example.helloworld", hello)
    .addStaticImport(hoverboard, "createNimbus")
    .addStaticImport(namedBoards, "*")
    .addStaticImport(Collections.class, "*")
    .build();

JavaPoet will first add your import static block to the file as configured, match and mangle all calls accordingly and also import all other types as needed.

package com.example.helloworld;

import static com.mattel.Hoverboard.Boards.*;
import static com.mattel.Hoverboard.createNimbus;
import static java.util.Collections.*;

import com.mattel.Hoverboard;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

class HelloWorld {
  List<Hoverboard> beyond() {
    List<Hoverboard> result = new ArrayList<>();
    result.add(createNimbus(2000));
    result.add(createNimbus("2001"));
    result.add(createNimbus(THUNDERBOLT));
    sort(result);
    return result.isEmpty() ? emptyList() : result;
  }
}

$N for Names

Generated code is often self-referential. Use $N to refer to another generated declaration by its name. Here's a method that calls another:

public String byteToHex(int b) {
  char[] result = new char[2];
  result[0] = hexDigit((b >>> 4) & 0xf);
  result[1] = hexDigit(b & 0xf);
  return new String(result);
}

public char hexDigit(int i) {
  return (char) (i < 10 ? i + '0' : i - 10 + 'a');
}

When generating the code above, we pass the hexDigit() method as an argument to the byteToHex() method using $N:

MethodSpec hexDigit = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("hexDigit")
    .addParameter(int.class, "i")
    .returns(char.class)
    .addStatement("return (char) (i < 10 ? i + '0' : i - 10 + 'a')")
    .build();

MethodSpec byteToHex = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("byteToHex")
    .addParameter(int.class, "b")
    .returns(String.class)
    .addStatement("char[] result = new char[2]")
    .addStatement("result[0] = $N((b >>> 4) & 0xf)", hexDigit)
    .addStatement("result[1] = $N(b & 0xf)", hexDigit)
    .addStatement("return new String(result)")
    .build();

Code block format strings

Code blocks may specify the values for their placeholders in a few ways. Only one style may be used for each operation on a code block.

Relative Arguments

Pass an argument value for each placeholder in the format string to CodeBlock.add(). In each example, we generate code to say "I ate 3 tacos"

CodeBlock.builder().add("I ate $L $L", 3, "tacos")

Positional Arguments

Place an integer index (1-based) before the placeholder in the format string to specify which argument to use.

CodeBlock.builder().add("I ate $2L $1L", "tacos", 3)

Named Arguments

Use the syntax $argumentName:X where X is the format character and call CodeBlock.addNamed() with a map containing all argument keys in the format string. Argument names use characters in a-z, A-Z, 0-9, and _, and must start with a lowercase character.

Map<String, Object> map = new LinkedHashMap<>();
map.put("food", "tacos");
map.put("count", 3);
CodeBlock.builder().addNamed("I ate $count:L $food:L", map)

Methods

All of the above methods have a code body. Use Modifiers.ABSTRACT to get a method without any body. This is only legal if the enclosing class is either abstract or an interface.

MethodSpec flux = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("flux")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.ABSTRACT, Modifier.PROTECTED)
    .build();

TypeSpec helloWorld = TypeSpec.classBuilder("HelloWorld")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC, Modifier.ABSTRACT)
    .addMethod(flux)
    .build();

Which generates this:

public abstract class HelloWorld {
  protected abstract void flux();
}

The other modifiers work where permitted. Note that when specifying modifiers, JavaPoet uses javax.lang.model.element.Modifier, a class that is not available on Android. This limitation applies to code-generating-code only; the output code runs everywhere: JVMs, Android, and GWT.

Methods also have parameters, exceptions, varargs, Javadoc, annotations, type variables, and a return type. All of these are configured with MethodSpec.Builder.

Constructors

MethodSpec is a slight misnomer; it can also be used for constructors:

MethodSpec flux = MethodSpec.constructorBuilder()
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC)
    .addParameter(String.class, "greeting")
    .addStatement("this.$N = $N", "greeting", "greeting")
    .build();

TypeSpec helloWorld = TypeSpec.classBuilder("HelloWorld")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC)
    .addField(String.class, "greeting", Modifier.PRIVATE, Modifier.FINAL)
    .addMethod(flux)
    .build();

Which generates this:

public class HelloWorld {
  private final String greeting;

  public HelloWorld(String greeting) {
    this.greeting = greeting;
  }
}

For the most part, constructors work just like methods. When emitting code, JavaPoet will place constructors before methods in the output file.

Parameters

Declare parameters on methods and constructors with either ParameterSpec.builder() or MethodSpec's convenient addParameter() API:

ParameterSpec android = ParameterSpec.builder(String.class, "android")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.FINAL)
    .build();

MethodSpec welcomeOverlords = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("welcomeOverlords")
    .addParameter(android)
    .addParameter(String.class, "robot", Modifier.FINAL)
    .build();

Though the code above to generate android and robot parameters is different, the output is the same:

void welcomeOverlords(final String android, final String robot) {
}

The extended Builder form is necessary when the parameter has annotations (such as @Nullable).

Fields

Like parameters, fields can be created either with builders or by using convenient helper methods:

FieldSpec android = FieldSpec.builder(String.class, "android")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PRIVATE, Modifier.FINAL)
    .build();

TypeSpec helloWorld = TypeSpec.classBuilder("HelloWorld")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC)
    .addField(android)
    .addField(String.class, "robot", Modifier.PRIVATE, Modifier.FINAL)
    .build();

Which generates:

public class HelloWorld {
  private final String android;

  private final String robot;
}

The extended Builder form is necessary when a field has Javadoc, annotations, or a field initializer. Field initializers use the same String.format()-like syntax as the code blocks above:

FieldSpec android = FieldSpec.builder(String.class, "android")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PRIVATE, Modifier.FINAL)
    .initializer("$S + $L", "Lollipop v.", 5.0d)
    .build();

Which generates:

private final String android = "Lollipop v." + 5.0;

Interfaces

JavaPoet has no trouble with interfaces. Note that interface methods must always be PUBLIC ABSTRACT and interface fields must always be PUBLIC STATIC FINAL. These modifiers are necessary when defining the interface:

TypeSpec helloWorld = TypeSpec.interfaceBuilder("HelloWorld")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC)
    .addField(FieldSpec.builder(String.class, "ONLY_THING_THAT_IS_CONSTANT")
        .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC, Modifier.STATIC, Modifier.FINAL)
        .initializer("$S", "change")
        .build())
    .addMethod(MethodSpec.methodBuilder("beep")
        .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC, Modifier.ABSTRACT)
        .build())
    .build();

But these modifiers are omitted when the code is generated. These are the defaults so we don't need to include them for javac's benefit!

public interface HelloWorld {
  String ONLY_THING_THAT_IS_CONSTANT = "change";

  void beep();
}

Enums

Use enumBuilder to create the enum type, and addEnumConstant() for each value:

TypeSpec helloWorld = TypeSpec.enumBuilder("Roshambo")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC)
    .addEnumConstant("ROCK")
    .addEnumConstant("SCISSORS")
    .addEnumConstant("PAPER")
    .build();

To generate this:

public enum Roshambo {
  ROCK,

  SCISSORS,

  PAPER
}

Fancy enums are supported, where the enum values override methods or call a superclass constructor. Here's a comprehensive example:

TypeSpec helloWorld = TypeSpec.enumBuilder("Roshambo")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC)
    .addEnumConstant("ROCK", TypeSpec.anonymousClassBuilder("$S", "fist")
        .addMethod(MethodSpec.methodBuilder("toString")
            .addAnnotation(Override.class)
            .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC)
            .addStatement("return $S", "avalanche!")
            .returns(String.class)
            .build())
        .build())
    .addEnumConstant("SCISSORS", TypeSpec.anonymousClassBuilder("$S", "peace")
        .build())
    .addEnumConstant("PAPER", TypeSpec.anonymousClassBuilder("$S", "flat")
        .build())
    .addField(String.class, "handsign", Modifier.PRIVATE, Modifier.FINAL)
    .addMethod(MethodSpec.constructorBuilder()
        .addParameter(String.class, "handsign")
        .addStatement("this.$N = $N", "handsign", "handsign")
        .build())
    .build();

Which generates this:

public enum Roshambo {
  ROCK("fist") {
    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return "avalanche!";
    }
  },

  SCISSORS("peace"),

  PAPER("flat");

  private final String handsign;

  Roshambo(String handsign) {
    this.handsign = handsign;
  }
}

Anonymous Inner Classes

In the enum code, we used TypeSpec.anonymousInnerClass(). Anonymous inner classes can also be used in code blocks. They are values that can be referenced with $L:

TypeSpec comparator = TypeSpec.anonymousClassBuilder("")
    .addSuperinterface(ParameterizedTypeName.get(Comparator.class, String.class))
    .addMethod(MethodSpec.methodBuilder("compare")
        .addAnnotation(Override.class)
        .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC)
        .addParameter(String.class, "a")
        .addParameter(String.class, "b")
        .returns(int.class)
        .addStatement("return $N.length() - $N.length()", "a", "b")
        .build())
    .build();

TypeSpec helloWorld = TypeSpec.classBuilder("HelloWorld")
    .addMethod(MethodSpec.methodBuilder("sortByLength")
        .addParameter(ParameterizedTypeName.get(List.class, String.class), "strings")
        .addStatement("$T.sort($N, $L)", Collections.class, "strings", comparator)
        .build())
    .build();

This generates a method that contains a class that contains a method:

void sortByLength(List<String> strings) {
  Collections.sort(strings, new Comparator<String>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(String a, String b) {
      return a.length() - b.length();
    }
  });
}

One particularly tricky part of defining anonymous inner classes is the arguments to the superclass constructor. In the above code we're passing the empty string for no arguments: TypeSpec.anonymousClassBuilder(""). To pass different parameters use JavaPoet's code block syntax with commas to separate arguments.

Annotations

Simple annotations are easy:

MethodSpec toString = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("toString")
    .addAnnotation(Override.class)
    .returns(String.class)
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC)
    .addStatement("return $S", "Hoverboard")
    .build();

Which generates this method with an @Override annotation:

  @Override
  public String toString() {
    return "Hoverboard";
  }

Use AnnotationSpec.builder() to set properties on annotations:

MethodSpec logRecord = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("recordEvent")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC, Modifier.ABSTRACT)
    .addAnnotation(AnnotationSpec.builder(Headers.class)
        .addMember("accept", "$S", "application/json; charset=utf-8")
        .addMember("userAgent", "$S", "Square Cash")
        .build())
    .addParameter(LogRecord.class, "logRecord")
    .returns(LogReceipt.class)
    .build();

Which generates this annotation with accept and userAgent properties:

@Headers(
    accept = "application/json; charset=utf-8",
    userAgent = "Square Cash"
)
LogReceipt recordEvent(LogRecord logRecord);

When you get fancy, annotation values can be annotations themselves. Use $L for embedded annotations:

MethodSpec logRecord = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("recordEvent")
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC, Modifier.ABSTRACT)
    .addAnnotation(AnnotationSpec.builder(HeaderList.class)
        .addMember("value", "$L", AnnotationSpec.builder(Header.class)
            .addMember("name", "$S", "Accept")
            .addMember("value", "$S", "application/json; charset=utf-8")
            .build())
        .addMember("value", "$L", AnnotationSpec.builder(Header.class)
            .addMember("name", "$S", "User-Agent")
            .addMember("value", "$S", "Square Cash")
            .build())
        .build())
    .addParameter(LogRecord.class, "logRecord")
    .returns(LogReceipt.class)
    .build();

Which generates this:

@HeaderList({
    @Header(name = "Accept", value = "application/json; charset=utf-8"),
    @Header(name = "User-Agent", value = "Square Cash")
})
LogReceipt recordEvent(LogRecord logRecord);

Note that you can call addMember() multiple times with the same property name to populate a list of values for that property.

Javadoc

Fields, methods and types can be documented with Javadoc:

MethodSpec dismiss = MethodSpec.methodBuilder("dismiss")
    .addJavadoc("Hides {@code message} from the caller's history. Other\n"
        + "participants in the conversation will continue to see the\n"
        + "message in their own history unless they also delete it.\n")
    .addJavadoc("\n")
    .addJavadoc("<p>Use {@link #delete($T)} to delete the entire\n"
        + "conversation for all participants.\n", Conversation.class)
    .addModifiers(Modifier.PUBLIC, Modifier.ABSTRACT)
    .addParameter(Message.class, "message")
    .build();

Which generates this:

  /**
   * Hides {@code message} from the caller's history. Other
   * participants in the conversation will continue to see the
   * message in their own history unless they also delete it.
   *
   * <p>Use {@link #delete(Conversation)} to delete the entire
   * conversation for all participants.
   */
  void dismiss(Message message);

Use $T when referencing types in Javadoc to get automatic imports.

Download

Download the latest .jar or depend via Maven:

<dependency>
  <groupId>com.squareup</groupId>
  <artifactId>javapoet</artifactId>
  <version>1.13.0</version>
</dependency>

or Gradle:

compile 'com.squareup:javapoet:1.13.0'

Snapshots of the development version are available in Sonatype's snapshots repository.

License

Copyright 2015 Square, Inc.

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
You may obtain a copy of the License at

   http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
limitations under the License.

JavaWriter

JavaPoet is the successor to JavaWriter. New projects should prefer JavaPoet because it has a stronger code model: it understands types and can manage imports automatically. JavaPoet is also better suited to composition: rather than streaming the contents of a .java file top-to-bottom in a single pass, a file can be assembled as a tree of declarations.

JavaWriter continues to be available in GitHub and Maven Central.

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Kotlin
28,812
star
4

picasso

A powerful image downloading and caching library for Android
Kotlin
18,604
star
5

moshi

A modern JSON library for Kotlin and Java.
Kotlin
9,279
star
6

okio

A modern I/O library for Android, Java, and Kotlin Multiplatform.
Kotlin
8,546
star
7

dagger

A fast dependency injector for Android and Java.
Java
7,315
star
8

crossfilter

Fast n-dimensional filtering and grouping of records.
JavaScript
6,226
star
9

PonyDebugger

Remote network and data debugging for your native iOS app using Chrome Developer Tools
Objective-C
5,866
star
10

maximum-awesome

Config files for vim and tmux.
Ruby
5,698
star
11

otto

An enhanced Guava-based event bus with emphasis on Android support.
Java
5,181
star
12

cubism

Cubism.js: A JavaScript library for time series visualization.
JavaScript
4,935
star
13

sqlbrite

A lightweight wrapper around SQLiteOpenHelper which introduces reactive stream semantics to SQL operations.
Java
4,586
star
14

android-times-square

Standalone Android widget for picking a single date from a calendar view.
Java
4,440
star
15

wire

gRPC and protocol buffers for Android, Kotlin, Swift and Java.
Kotlin
4,115
star
16

cube

Cube: A system for time series visualization.
JavaScript
3,918
star
17

Valet

Valet lets you securely store data in the iOS, tvOS, or macOS Keychain without knowing a thing about how the Keychain works. Itโ€™s easy. We promise.
Swift
3,913
star
18

kotlinpoet

A Kotlin API for generating .kt source files.
Kotlin
3,681
star
19

java-code-styles

IntelliJ IDEA code style settings for Square's Java and Android projects.
Shell
2,941
star
20

flow

Name UI states, navigate between them, remember where you've been.
Java
2,791
star
21

spoon

Distributing instrumentation tests to all your Androids.
HTML
2,701
star
22

keywhiz

A system for distributing and managing secrets
Java
2,611
star
23

tape

A lightning fast, transactional, file-based FIFO for Android and Java.
Java
2,459
star
24

mortar

A simple library that makes it easy to pair thin views with dedicated controllers, isolated from most of the vagaries of the Activity life cycle.
Java
2,162
star
25

certstrap

Tools to bootstrap CAs, certificate requests, and signed certificates.
Go
2,139
star
26

go-jose

An implementation of JOSE standards (JWE, JWS, JWT) in Go
1,979
star
27

Cleanse

Lightweight Swift Dependency Injection Framework
Swift
1,748
star
28

assertj-android

A set of AssertJ helpers geared toward testing Android.
Java
1,583
star
29

haha

DEPRECATED Java library to automate the analysis of Android heap dumps.
Java
1,435
star
30

phrase

Phrase is an Android string resource templating library
Java
1,403
star
31

cane

Code quality threshold checking as part of your build
Ruby
1,325
star
32

seismic

Android device shake detection.
Java
1,275
star
33

sudo_pair

Plugin for sudo that requires another human to approve and monitor privileged sudo sessions
Rust
1,222
star
34

anvil

A Kotlin compiler plugin to make dependency injection with Dagger 2 easier.
Kotlin
1,194
star
35

spacecommander

Commit fully-formatted Objective-C as a team without even trying.
Objective-C
1,125
star
36

workflow

A Swift and Kotlin library for making composable state machines, and UIs driven by those state machines.
Shell
1,090
star
37

square.github.io

A simple, static portal which outlines our open source offerings.
CSS
1,083
star
38

workflow-kotlin

A Swift and Kotlin library for making composable state machines, and UIs driven by those state machines.
Kotlin
946
star
39

certigo

A utility to examine and validate certificates in a variety of formats
Go
900
star
40

logcat

I CAN HAZ LOGZ?
Kotlin
882
star
41

whorlwind

Makes fingerprint encryption a breeze.
Java
818
star
42

dagger-intellij-plugin

An IntelliJ IDEA plugin for Dagger which provides insight into how injections and providers are used.
Java
800
star
43

cycler

Kotlin
793
star
44

radiography

Text-ray goggles for your Android UI.
Kotlin
791
star
45

apropos

A simple way to serve up appropriate images for every visitor.
Ruby
766
star
46

Paralayout

Paralayout is a set of simple, useful, and straightforward utilities that enable pixel-perfect layout in iOS. Your designers will love you.
Swift
766
star
47

shift

shift is an application that helps you run schema migrations on MySQL databases
Ruby
735
star
48

coordinators

Simple MVWhatever for Android
Java
705
star
49

subzero

Block's Bitcoin Cold Storage solution.
C
662
star
50

shuttle

String extraction, translation and export tools for the 21st century. "Moving strings around so you don't have to"
Ruby
657
star
51

gifencoder

A pure Java library implementing the GIF89a specification. Suitable for use on Android.
Java
655
star
52

Blueprint

Declarative UI construction for iOS, written in Swift
Swift
644
star
53

pollexor

Java client for the Thumbor image service which allows you to build URIs in an expressive fashion using a fluent API.
Java
633
star
54

kochiku

Shard your builds for fun and profit
Ruby
605
star
55

intro-to-d3

a D3.js tutorial
CSS
603
star
56

curtains

Lift the curtain on Android Windows!
Kotlin
548
star
57

RxIdler

An IdlingResource for Espresso which wraps an RxJava Scheduler.
Java
505
star
58

field-kit

FieldKit lets you take control of your text fields.
JavaScript
465
star
59

burst

A unit testing library for varying test data.
Java
464
star
60

otto-intellij-plugin

An IntelliJ IDEA plugin to navigate between events posted by Otto.
Java
454
star
61

SuperDelegate

SuperDelegate provides a clean application delegate interface and protects you from bugs in the application lifecycle
Swift
454
star
62

svelte-store

TypeScript
433
star
63

js-jose

JavaScript library to encrypt/decrypt data in JSON Web Encryption (JWE) format and to sign/verify data in JSON Web Signature (JWS) format. Leverages Browser's native WebCrypto API.
JavaScript
421
star
64

sharkey

Sharkey is a service for managing certificates for use by OpenSSH
Go
390
star
65

fdoc

Documentation format and verification
Ruby
379
star
66

ETL

Extract, Transform, and Load data with Ruby
Ruby
377
star
67

lgtm

Simple object validation for JavaScript.
JavaScript
366
star
68

connect-api-examples

Code samples demonstrating the functionality of the Square Connect API
JavaScript
364
star
69

laravel-hyrule

Object-oriented, composable, fluent API for writing validations in Laravel
PHP
338
star
70

in-app-payments-flutter-plugin

Flutter Plugin for Square In-App Payments SDK
Objective-C
329
star
71

papa

PAPA: Performance of Android Production Applications
Kotlin
320
star
72

pylink

Python Library for device debugging/programming via J-Link
Python
308
star
73

rails-auth

Modular resource-based authentication and authorization for Rails/Rack
Ruby
290
star
74

workflow-swift

A Swift and Kotlin library for making composable state machines, and UIs driven by those state machines.
Swift
285
star
75

pysurvival

Open source package for Survival Analysis modeling
HTML
281
star
76

cocoapods-generate

A CocoaPods plugin that allows you to easily generate a workspace from a podspec.
Ruby
265
star
77

inspect

inspect is a collection of metrics gathering, analysis utilities for various subsystems of linux, mysql and postgres.
Go
264
star
78

Aardvark

Aardvark is a library that makes it dead simple to create actionable bug reports.
Objective-C
256
star
79

jetpack

jet.pack: package your JRuby rack app for Jetty.
Ruby
249
star
80

luhnybin

Shell
232
star
81

gradle-dependencies-sorter

A CLI app and Gradle plugin to sort the dependencies in your Gradle build scripts
Kotlin
216
star
82

auto-value-redacted

An extension for Google's AutoValue that omits redacted fields from toString().
Java
211
star
83

protoparser

Java parser for .proto schema declarations.
Java
209
star
84

squalor

Go SQL utility library
Go
199
star
85

p2

Platypus Platform: Tools for Scalable Deployment
Go
196
star
86

mimecraft

Utility for creating RFC-compliant multipart and form-encoded HTTP request bodies.
Java
195
star
87

git-fastclone

git clone --recursive on steroids
Ruby
180
star
88

zapp

Continuous Integration for KIF
Objective-C
179
star
89

metrics

Metrics Query Engine
Go
170
star
90

Listable

Declarative list views for iOS apps.
Swift
164
star
91

wire-gradle-plugin

A Gradle plugin for generating Java code for your protocol buffer definitions with Wire.
Groovy
153
star
92

quotaservice

The purpose of a quota service is to prevent cascading failures in micro-service environments. The service acts as a traffic cop, slowing down traffic where necessary to prevent overloading services. For this to work, remote procedure calls (RPCs) between services consult the quota service before making a call. The service isnโ€™t strictly for RPCs between services, and can even be used to apply quotas to database calls, for example.
Go
150
star
93

goprotowrap

A package-at-a-time wrapper for protoc, for generating Go protobuf code.
Go
148
star
94

beancounter

Utility to audit the balance of Hierarchical Deterministic (HD) wallets. Supports multisig + segwit wallets.
Go
141
star
95

ruby-rrule

RRULE expansion for Ruby
Ruby
140
star
96

womeng_handbook

Everything you need to start or expand a women in engineering group in your community.
129
star
97

cocoapods-check

A CocoaPods plugin that shows differences between locked and installed Pods
Ruby
127
star
98

rce-agent

gRPC-based Remote Command Execution Agent
Go
124
star
99

spincycle

Automate and expose complex infrastructure tasks to teams and services.
Go
116
star
100

point-of-sale-android-sdk

A simple library for letting Point of Sale take in-store payments for your app using Point of Sale API.
Java
116
star